Avian Biology, Volume VIII by Donald S. Farner

By Donald S. Farner

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C. T. Nisbet, in Hunt 1980; Davis, 1975; also alcids: Bédard, 1969a, 1976; Hunt et al, 1979, 1981c). Likewise, colonial caciques may have regularly preferred foraging areas and thus may use only a small, acentric portion of the potential foraging arena (Feekes, 1981). Such patterns clearly violate assumption (2) above. Thus, while the geometric model remains viable, a number of the required as­ sumptions are either violated or untested, as is its prediction of reduced foraging effort. C. INFORMATION TRANSFER AND F O O D FINDING Birds need information concerning the location and abundance of food, and under certain circumstances they can obtain this information from indi­ viduals of the same or other species.

WITTENBERGER AND GEORGE L. HUNT, JR. several mechanisms have been proposed whereby information can be ob­ tained by previously unsuccessful foragers without the direct help of pre­ viously successful individuals. At least three forms of information transfer may enhance foraging efficien­ cy around colony sites. , 1972; Krebs, 1973). They may locate food clumps by opportunistically converging on places where the presence or behavior of others indicates a food patch. Finally, they may follow others from colony sites to find good foraging locations (the information center hypothesis).

Likewise, colonial caciques may have regularly preferred foraging areas and thus may use only a small, acentric portion of the potential foraging arena (Feekes, 1981). Such patterns clearly violate assumption (2) above. Thus, while the geometric model remains viable, a number of the required as­ sumptions are either violated or untested, as is its prediction of reduced foraging effort. C. INFORMATION TRANSFER AND F O O D FINDING Birds need information concerning the location and abundance of food, and under certain circumstances they can obtain this information from indi­ viduals of the same or other species.

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